Portland Sees A Chance To Do Redevelopment Right

The corner of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Alberta Street in Northeast Portland is getting new life after decades as an empty lot as the long-awaited and controversial Alberta Commons project finally opens its doors. Northeast Portland is the city’s historically black corridor, but one redevelopment project after another has left the black population as just that … More Portland Sees A Chance To Do Redevelopment Right

Before Moving To New Job, HBCU President Reflects On A University’s Progress

When Harris-Stowe State University President Dwaun Warmack graduated from high school, he had a 1.7 grade-point average and did not think he was college material. Today, Warmack, 42, is one of the youngest presidents of a four-year college in the country. His journey with Harris-Stowe in St. Louis began in 2014, but come July 31, he will leave the … More Before Moving To New Job, HBCU President Reflects On A University’s Progress

At Muslim Sunday School, Learning About Islam — And Correcting Misconceptions

Off a highway in central Connecticut is the mosque with a 400-student Muslim Sunday school. More guards are on patrol these days. And for the older students in the transition class, talking about Islamophobia is not only welcomed, but encouraged. The teenagers are in their final years of high school and will be heading off … More At Muslim Sunday School, Learning About Islam — And Correcting Misconceptions

109-Year-Old Parade Raises Money For Children’s Mental Health Care

For over a century, the Annie Malone Children and Family Services agency has brought thousands of community members together in the country’s second-largest African American parade: the Annie Malone May Day Parade. Last Sunday’s procession marked its 109th celebration in downtown St. Louis. Parade viewers saw marching bands, local business owners on floats and peppy cheerleaders throughout … More 109-Year-Old Parade Raises Money For Children’s Mental Health Care

Former NFL Player Challenges The Stereotypes Of Black Fathers Through Children’s Book ‘Hair Love’

A few years ago, former NFL player-turned-filmmaker, Matthew A. Cherry noticed a plethora of viral videos of young African American fathers styling their daughter’s natural hair and bonding with them in gender nonconforming ways. The videos were far more popular than similar social videos about black fathers connecting with their sons. And that struck Cherry as interesting. … More Former NFL Player Challenges The Stereotypes Of Black Fathers Through Children’s Book ‘Hair Love’

Someone Called The Police On Her: Now This Lawmaker Is Fighting For Change

Across the country, state legislatures have become more diverse over the past four years. New lawmakers bring different backgrounds and life experiences, and that can lead them to push for more inclusive measures. In Oregon, Rep. Janelle Bynum, D-Clackamas, is the only African American legislator in the state House. Last summer, Bynum was canvassing voters in her district … More Someone Called The Police On Her: Now This Lawmaker Is Fighting For Change

Some Black Kansas City Residents Say Renaming A Street Is Erasing History

Micheal Logan remembers a time when blacks in Kansas City, Missouri, weren’t allowed to go south of 27th Street. So for him, when Paseo Boulevard officially became Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard in February, it felt as if the opinions of many black residents had been ignored. “Black people know this, know Paseo more than the average … More Some Black Kansas City Residents Say Renaming A Street Is Erasing History

Leticia Colón de Mejias: Green Eco Warrior

Leticia Colón de Mejias thinks no problem is insurmountable if Americans come together. “Sometimes we take these subjects and we make them so big and scary that people feel we can’t take action,” said Colón, 42, a Connecticut entrepreneur, environmentalist and mother of seven. “Climate change seems terrifying. And everyone’s like, it’s too big.” But … More Leticia Colón de Mejias: Green Eco Warrior

Khalia Collier: Team Owner Shoots For More Women In Pro Basketball’s Owner, Referee Ranks

Women make up just a fraction of professional basketball referees, coaches and owners. A St. Louis woman is doing her best to change that. Khalia Collier is owner and general manager of the St. Louis Surge, the region’s only professional women’s sports team. In her eighth season at the helm of the team, Collier is also … More Khalia Collier: Team Owner Shoots For More Women In Pro Basketball’s Owner, Referee Ranks

Annie Watson: From Never Wanting Children To Early Childhood Advocate

Setting children up for academic success is Annie Watson’s driving passion. The Kansas City, Missouri, native is the director of early education and parent success at Turn the Page KC, a non-profit that aims to have all children reading at grade level by third grade. Watson, 31, also helps lead the Parent Leadership Training Institute, … More Annie Watson: From Never Wanting Children To Early Childhood Advocate

An Iconic Black-Owned Grocery In Kansas City Closes

Tony Ross lives in the small town of Peculiar, Missouri, now, but he was shopping at Leon’s Thriftway on East 39th Street days before the grocery business shut its doors for good. Ross was shopping for his mother who lives in a nearby senior living facility. “My mom is devastated. We all devastated,” Ross said. … More An Iconic Black-Owned Grocery In Kansas City Closes

Oregon Man Sentenced To Life In Prison For Hate Crime Killing

An Oregon judge sentenced Russell Courtier to life in prison for the 2016 murder of Larnell Bruce Jr. Courtier will serve at least 30 years before becoming eligible for parole. Last month, a jury convicted Courtier of murder and second-degree intimidation, which functions as Oregon’s hate crime statute. He was also convicted of failure to perform the duty … More Oregon Man Sentenced To Life In Prison For Hate Crime Killing